What is happening to my skin?

Skin, the largest organ of the body is a system that works optimally. However, with ageing, gradually the skin starts to decline in the quality of collagen production as well as the rate of cell production and functioning. A skincare program focus should be preventative and maintaining the integrity of the skin’s functions, collagen production and quality. Establishing a good skin care program in early years helps to maintain the skin’s optimal functioning for longer. Daily sun care protection is essential in assisting with maintaining skin's integrity.

What does my skin need?

A good anti-oxidant will assist in preventing skin damage.

Maintain optimum hydration in the skin.

Maintain the rate of cell turnover.

What is happening to my skin?

The slowing down of the skin’s production, quality of production and functioning is visibly noticeable with the appearance of fine lines, uneven dull texture. The rate and quality of production is declining. The system’s functioning starts to noticeably slow in your 30’s. The quality of collagen and hyaluronic acid production, for example, starts deteriorating. Slowly the barrier will start to become impaired and the build up of elastosis, the degeneration of elastin, becomes noticeable in the form of fine lines and wrinkles.

What does my skin need?

Increase cell turnover to encourage new cell growth and assist with uneven, dull skin tone

Focus on reducing the rate of elastosis

Increase collagen’s quality and rate of production.

Focus on anti-oxidants to scavenge free radicals and assist in preventing further damage to collagen.

What is happening to my skin?

As we age the rate of skin ageing accelerates, which requires more aggressive correction therapies. A by product of cellular metabolism, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) or free radicals, builds up and causes damage to critical cellular components like membranes, enzymes and Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). Consequently, proliferation, the balance between an increase in the number of cells and cell death, begins to decline in the epidermis, initiating a steady deterioration of skin structure and function. The barrier may show signs of impairment with the skin feeling dry and tight more reguarly. Cumulative sun damage may start to show with blotchiness and brown spots. The ‘power house’ or ‘battery’ of skin cells, the mitochondria, decreases in activity, increasing it’s activity assists in more optimal skin functioning.

Skincare should focus on increasing the frequency of exfoliating therapies, maintaining optimum moisture content to retain the integrity of the barrier and increase collagen production and quality.

What does my skin need?

Increases cell turnover and addressing textural irregularities

Increasing mitochondrial activity, increasing collagen production

Replenishing moisture content

Anti-oxidant support

Elastotic reversal

What is happening to my skin?

Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity. Estrogen receptors are found in the skin and due to estrogen depletion, associated with menopause, the skin ages at an accelerated rate, with both structural and functional deterioration.

Skin progressively thins, the epidermis thickness reduces by 6.4% per decade, especially in women. A reduction of water in the Stratum Corneum, causes barrier impairment, leading to dry skin. The lipid content of aged skin is reduced by as much as 65%. Visibly, you will notice a dull uneven complexion, deep expression lines, larger pores, sun damage and sagging skin.

Skincare should focus on correcting the barrier as this will determine how aggressively the ageing process can be addressed and corrected.

During 60’s, 70’s and 80’s the rate of ageing is accelerated and the signs become more extreme.

What does my skin need?

Replenish moisture levels, this will restore the impaired barrier.

Focusing on increasing cell turnover

Repair damaged collagen and slow down further degradation of collagen.

What is happening to my skin?

Skin, the largest organ of the body is a system that works optimally. However, with ageing, gradually the skin starts to decline in the quality of collagen production as well as the rate of cell production and functioning. A skincare program focus should be preventative and maintaining the integrity of the skin’s functions, collagen production and quality. Establishing a good skin care program in early years helps to maintain the skin’s optimal functioning for longer. Daily sun care protection is essential in assisting with maintaining skin's integrity.

What does my skin need?

A good anti-oxidant will assist in preventing skin damage.

Maintain optimum hydration in the skin.

Maintain the rate of cell turnover.

What is happening to my skin?

The slowing down of the skin’s production, quality of production and functioning is visibly noticeable with the appearance of fine lines, uneven dull texture. The rate and quality of production is declining. The system’s functioning starts to noticeably slow in your 30’s. The quality of collagen and hyaluronic acid production, for example, starts deteriorating. Slowly the barrier will start to become impaired and the build up of elastosis, the degeneration of elastin, becomes noticeable in the form of fine lines and wrinkles.

What does my skin need?

Increase cell turnover to encourage new cell growth and assist with uneven, dull skin tone

Focus on reducing the rate of elastosis

Increase collagen’s quality and rate of production.

Focus on anti-oxidants to scavenge free radicals and assist in preventing further damage to collagen.

What is happening to my skin?

As we age the rate of skin ageing accelerates, which requires more aggressive correction therapies. A by product of cellular metabolism, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) or free radicals, builds up and causes damage to critical cellular components like membranes, enzymes and Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). Consequently, proliferation, the balance between an increase in the number of cells and cell death, begins to decline in the epidermis, initiating a steady deterioration of skin structure and function. The barrier may show signs of impairment with the skin feeling dry and tight more reguarly. Cumulative sun damage may start to show with blotchiness and brown spots. The ‘power house’ or ‘battery’ of skin cells, the mitochondria, decreases in activity, increasing it’s activity assists in more optimal skin functioning.

Skincare should focus on increasing the frequency of exfoliating therapies, maintaining optimum moisture content to retain the integrity of the barrier and increase collagen production and quality.

What does my skin need?

Increases cell turnover and addressing textural irregularities

Increasing mitochondrial activity, increasing collagen production

Replenishing moisture content

Anti-oxidant support

Elastotic reversal

What is happening to my skin?

Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity. Estrogen receptors are found in the skin and due to estrogen depletion, associated with menopause, the skin ages at an accelerated rate, with both structural and functional deterioration.

Skin progressively thins, the epidermis thickness reduces by 6.4% per decade, especially in women. A reduction of water in the Stratum Corneum, causes barrier impairment, leading to dry skin. The lipid content of aged skin is reduced by as much as 65%. Visibly, you will notice a dull uneven complexion, deep expression lines, larger pores, sun damage and sagging skin.

Skincare should focus on correcting the barrier as this will determine how aggressively the ageing process can be addressed and corrected.

During 60’s, 70’s and 80’s the rate of ageing is accelerated and the signs become more extreme.

What does my skin need?

Replenish moisture levels, this will restore the impaired barrier.

Focusing on increasing cell turnover

Repair damaged collagen and slow down further degradation of collagen.